Lifestyle

In Uganda, we eat rolex. We don’t wear them!

Keep calm and continue salivating. We have more awesome pics at the end.

Keep calm and continue salivating. We have more awesome pics at the end. PHOTO: Monitor

Just close your eyes and imagine the look on the face of a European visiting Uganda for the first time wondering why the respected Swiss watch brand– Rolex, is being sold at roadside stands only to be shocked later that in Uganda, it is a type of food.

In Uganda, Rolex is not a watch but a rolled chapatti with two or more eggs (depending on your appetite) carefully and strategically mixed with tomatoes, onions, cabbages or carrots just like the biggest Fast Food Gurus in the world for example McDonalds or Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC).

In fact, if you ask a random Ugandan what a rolex is and answers you that it is a watch, he will be considered the most ignorant Ugandan for failure to answer a question which even a seven year old can answer without hesitation or he is simply not a Ugandan!

For many years, rolex has remained the number one delicacy for the young people, university students and bachelors all over Uganda. This is because be it breakfast, lunch or dinner, the rolex is the greatest companion of all time. It is just a snack without borders!

From Kampala to Wandegeya, Mukono, Jinja, Fort Portal or Gulu, you can never miss setting your eyes on a rolex stand in the nearest market place. Most being in strategic positions usually staged at the front places so as to make purchase easy for the customers. However, care must be exercised in choosing where to buy due to health concerns for some vendors might be dirty.

The “rolex invention”, is believed to have originated from Wandegeya around 2003 by a man called Sula who first sought the idea of selling chapatti with scrambled eggs together. At only UGX 500 by then, one could get a heavy rolex and begin belching away in satisfaction.

His invention was indeed a novel (original). It soon become popular for Makerere University students not only due to it’s rareness but because it was a fast snack to be relied on during rush hours and when times were hard. It was from this that it later spread like a wildfire to different places around the country and now becoming part of our identity and uniqueness only found in Uganda.

Today, you can find rolex stands almost anywhere in Uganda but most especially the central, eastern, southern and western parts of the country. It is even sold in expensive restaurants around the city which comes with paying a little extra bucks due to the economic environment. It is loved due to it being a relatively inexpensive meal and delicious thus being a delicacy for most low income earners today.

Surprisingly, learning how to make a rolex or chapattis, does not require extraordinary skills or first going to school. It is something easy to learn just by following the steps being used by the seller. Perhaps, what is required is balance and stamina to be able to do a perfect timing of the procedures to make one. Maybe that explains why it is rare to find a lady selling them.

If you want to make a business out of it, all you need is small start up capital less than UGX 100, 000 to be able to buy a charcoal stove, frying pan, wheat flour, salt, water and cooking oil as the basic requirements. Having a good name for your stand will also make you win hearts for example “Dembe’s Rolex Productions”, “Rolex Lovers Zone”, “Obama Rolex Care” and “Katende Fried Rolex (KFR) because as they say… it is all about first impressions.

#ProudlyUgandan

 

The art of rolex making. Photographer :Irene Namuganyi. Find her other awesome works here

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2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Pingback: One Ugandan’s Open Letter to Billy Ocean | This Is Uganda

  2. charliebeau Diary of a Muzungu

    June 7, 2015 at 12:51 pm

    Fantastic!

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