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Uganda Innovates

MatatArt, an innovation promoting access to arts for children in Kampala

Meet MatatArt, a flexible tool becoming a regular minivan being used to generate a joyful interaction with the surrounding environment and an attractive transformation of the urban space.

“Our bespoke vehicle will transform any space making it suitable for performing a wide variety of art based activities.” Susan Tusabe, the Literacy Advocate at MatatArt says.

MatatArt therefore, is a mobile all-in-one structure that delivers art to children’s doorstep even in places where there is little infrastructure, equipment, services or facilities.

The MatatArt team wanted to create something able to attract the children of the slums and, through the Arts show them beauty, joy and wonder. (Photo by MatatArt)

The MatatArt team wanted to create something able to attract the children of the slums and, through the Arts show them beauty, joy and wonder. (Photo by MatatArt)

How MatatArt started

None of the founders can actually remember the exact moment when MatatArt came to life.

Every one of them has probably always been carrying inside the idea and the feelings of MatatArt. When life brought the three of them together, in Kampala, the idea was ready to be born and started to absorb every moment and thought of them.

MatatArt is the result of an unstoppable and overwhelming flow of ideas, images, sounds and colors that captured the founders and attracted everyone who was coming close to the idea. The potential of the project and the enthusiasm of the trio became so   contagious that friends and colleagues were willing to take part to the development of the project.

The team was moving from the concept of the ice-cream man moving around the city’s neighborhoods by bicycle, attracting swarms of children with an unmistakable melody. They wanted to create something able to attract the children of the slums and, through the Arts show them beauty, joy and wonder.

Susan, Francesco, Maria and all their friends believe that Arts represent the occasion to change something ordinary into something extraordinary, to enrich the quality of everyone’ lives, to develop effective ways of expressing thoughts, knowledge and feelings, finding innovative solutions. A major limitation to the children’ development in Uganda is the lack of services and activities such as libraries, art galleries and music halls. The ice-cream man does not wait for the children to come to him, he reaches out to them. So why not bring culture to the children?!

How MatatArt works

 

The team replicated the bicycle in a unique elaboration of a “matatu”, the most common means of transportation in Kampala, and the ice creams in hundreds of books, colors and songs.

MatatArt chooses to deliver Arts to the children’s doorstep even in places where there is little infrastructure, equipment, services or facilities, being a mobile all-in-one structure itself. With its innovative approach, MatatArt produces a joyful transformation of the surrounding environment, making any space suitable for performing art based activities, in order to entertain and engage children and communities.

The project involves a wide network of organizations, artists and professionals to ensure the sustainability of the project and a variety of activities and events to enrich MatatArt’ sessions.

MatatArt is a flexible tool to enrich children with Visual Art, Literature and Music but also to address sensitive issues and problems (HIV, environment, sanitation, etc.) with ad hoc sessions. The project is planning to reach, with just one vehicle, an estimated number of 6.300 children during its first year of activity, searching for evidences about the behavioral change obtained by the children through an exposure to art-based activities.

A 3D illustration of the MatatArt interior. (illustration by MatatArt)

A 3D illustration of the MatatArt interior. (illustration by MatatArt)

The Future

The Team believes that MatatArt should be everywhere! They imagine many MatatArt vehicles with different designs and colors moving around every town of Uganda and, why not, reaching the children from all over the world.

Like this story? Or have something to share? Write to us: info@thisisuganda.org, or connect with us on Facebook and Twitter (@thisisuganda_).

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Uganda Innovates

How Ensibuuko is building Life Changing ICT-Mobile solutions for the under-served Rural Poor

Almost four years ago when youth unemployment was at its peak and everyone was clamoring for a steady job, Gerald Otim decided to walk into the world of self employment. Having had a humble beginning, he was no stranger to starting small and therefore he ventured into the building a solution that would improve financial service delivery in rural communities.

In 2014, Gerald a Fin-Tech Entrepreneur and a graduate of Development Economics at Makerere University together with David Opio, co-founded Ensibuuko, a Ugandan ICT startup that is modernizing the way financial cooperatives (popularly known as SACCOS – Savings and Credit Cooperatives) manage data and deliver financial services.

“We are providing modern electronic banking infrastructure to financial services entities unique to the developing world. Our main service is a cloud-based banking software platform for micro-finances and SACCOS. The platform automates business processes, customer and transactional data, and provides standard accounting and reporting functionality for Ensibuuko’s customers.” Gerald explains.

Ensibuuko’s software is a cloud-based MOBIS Micro-Finance Software first designed at the Kampala based ICT hub, Outbox and is creating a solution that allows for web services even in rural areas with poor telecom infrastructure thereby contributing significantly to the efforts for financial inclusion in Uganda and across Africa.

The Start Up’s software is also integrated to the mobile phone network allowing users to access their account via mobile phone — they can check the balance, make deposits and withdraw. This improves access and quality of service delivery.

“Our solution is integrated with Mobile Money thus people in hard-to-reach places can be part of the easy access of the service. We are now using partnerships with mobile Network Operators to deliver a dedicated internet bundle that enables institutions access the solution on cloud even on weak networks for just 30,000 shillings a month ($8).” Gerald notes.

The platform therefore exists to equalize financial services in Uganda as is the case in many other African countries where banks are urban based. People in rural communities will be served mainly by a cooperative institution.

According to Ensibuuko, there are major issues in the financial services sector in the developing world: Banks are concentrated in major towns, Services are expensive and loans have interest rates of not less than 24%. It is part of the general problem of poor and expensive financial services infrastructure in all of the developing world. Instead of working with banks, most people will prefer a non-bank financial institution mostly in the nature of a Cooperative financial institution such as a Savings and Credit Cooperative (SACCOS) or Credit Union.

Through Ensibuuko, Gerald has created a platform that is bringing financial services to the developing world.

“These institutions usually have no access to modern infrastructure and they rely a lot on human resources for their operations as they continue rudimentary means to manage financial information and make decisions.” Gerald notes.

To date, Ensibuuko’s business volume is 151 SACCOS reached in 2 years. Of these, 14 are newly signed, 35 are active on the Mobis platform and 102 are on their current pipeline in Uganda. There are over 14 other institutions in 3 other African markets that are currently in business with Ensibuuko through its recently established  franchises in Zambia and Tanzania. Ensibuuko has raised 1 Million USD in funding (500,000 of which came through a recent Equity investment deal) and maybe the first ever ICT startup with Ugandan only founders to raise this much funding within its first two years of existence.

Inefficiency, human error, fraudulent tendencies have become typical of these institutions and is undermining their role in delivering financial services to the under-served. In Uganda there are over 6000 registered SACCOS serving 18 million people. It is estimated that there are over 300,000 of such institutions in Africa. By using technology to strengthen financial institutions, Ensibuuko has the potential to significantly disrupt the rural financial services sector not just in Uganda but across Africa.

Like this story or have something to share? Write to us: info@thisisuganda.org, or connect with us on Facebook and Twitter.

 

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Uganda Innovates

Fundi Bots, a Lab that is unleashing Ugandan robotics genius

By Hugues Safari and Ninahazwe Lucia Bella, (Yaga Burundi.)  and    (Habari DRC)

At a time when most African educational systems no longer meet the expectations of “geek” students, a robotic lab, Fundi Bots, was born in Uganda, founded by Solomon King who himself dropped out of the University, tired of “studying for exams. ”

The intelligent and calm, Solomon King says, with a wide smile.  “I am not a rebel, I am just a man disappointed by our education system.” He rolled up he sleeves and had to so something about it. From this frustration,  Fundi Bots, a robotic lab,  that receives engineering enthusiasts from the age of six was born.

The word fundi means engineer in Swahili.

“Here in this lab, we put more focus on practice than on long theories. Our schools and universities train people to just take exams! But nothing practical. He says. This reality is unfortunately that of many African countries.

Based in Kampala, the Ugandan capital. Solomon King is the Ugandan who 16 years ago, left the university after just a semester. He formed passionately alone on the internet. In his early days, he won two awards in 2014 (Echoing Green Fellowship and Ashoka fellow) with his achievements in robotics and computer science. Today, he wants to help thousands of young people to reveal their talents.

Fundi Bots has a learning room where everything is removable and mobile: this is the case for walls, furniture and the laboratory.

“Everything is mobile here, we can customize the learning room according to what we want. It’s our magic here, “says Rosebell Nsita, Public Relations Officer at Fundi Bots.

Like her team leader, she too was disappointed by the education system, before discovering her talents in human relations in this organization. Rosebell has been passionate about art since she was very young. But the theory lessons of Ugandan universities have not helped her to pursue her passion. She explains that it is especially by taking inspiration from her experience that she had this desire to help other young people discover their potential through Fundi Bots.

“Classes are free when you register with Fundi Bots and learners are guided in courses of their choice. We have opened this lab specifically for students who feel dissatisfied with what they are learning at university. We teach them the basics of computer science, mechanics and electronics. We do everything so that they learn in a fun way.”

Henry (in black) facilitating a session.

Fundi Bots has proved his skills, so much so that today he is asked in primary and secondary schools in Uganda to provide practical courses in parallel with the theory. This generates an income for the administrative expenses of the lab, which is added to the external financing already collected by Fundi bots. Learning in this lab is via robots.

This way of learning through practice aims to make students learn better and faster. Some have better grades in their universities after their internships at Fundi Bots. “Our methods have recently helped a young person who throughout his school career was terrible in physics. But after learning from practice here at home, her grades in this class have improved. He distinguished himself and he does science at the university, “says Rosebella

Henry, 26, is a trainer at Fundi Bots. It is he who guides us around the laboratory. A treasure room for our eyes that had never seen robots invented by Africans. Wooden rover, with printed cards with exceptional diagrams, or a 3D printer.  We were amazed by everything we saw: respect for the proportions and details of these robots.  “Personally, I would like to change people’s lives through robotics. I plan to work on an agricultural application to allow Ugandan farmers to increase their output and household income. ” Henry says.

It should be noted that Henry has a university degree, but says that he  learned almost nothing concrete. Fundi Bots is the school where his abilities have been enhanced. Today, his greatest joy lies in his ability to create new concepts, which he could not have achieved elsewhere other than in the Lab Fundi bots, he believes. For Solomon King, changing or impacting one life is already a success – dozens of stories of lives changed positively since Fundi bot’s inception.

“We have already had more than 3,000 learners in our walls, and the following years we intend to extend to Rwanda and Tanzania  with the help of our partners.” Solomon King deplores the fact that the Ugandan government, which has promised to integrate the best practice provided by Fundi Bots into the national education program, is yet to deliver on its promise.

“As usual, they promise more than they realize,” said Solomon King. He remains confident for the rest of the program and his ultimate dream is that by 20 years, Africa will have caught up in technology and youth employment.”But if possible we would like to do it in less time,” he hopes confidently.

Like this story or have something to share? Write to us: info@thisisuganda.org, or connect with us on Facebook and Twitter.

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Uganda Innovates

9 Co-Working Spaces for Start-Ups in Kampala

Co-working spaces are a great alternative to working from home or in a crowded coffee shop. Whether you need an office for a day or six months, co-working spaces are ideal for freelancers, start-ups and business travelers.

The spaces offer connectivity, a concentration of digital resources, and a proper work infrastructure where there may otherwise be none. They are affordable, full of startup geeks like yourself and probably cooler than any office your startup could afford. So, feast your eyes on the following 10 coolest co-working spaces available in Kampala.

Tribe Kampala

Tribe Kampala is one of the newest co-working spaces in Kampala. It offers monthly subscription coworking space in Kisementi, Kampala providing affordable, flexible access to a prime workspace to work, learn and meet. Tribe Kampala is open to individuals and teams working in diverse domains of expertise. It’s designed to give you a spacious, uplifting and open environment. Surrounded by great eateries, coffee shops, shops, bars and restaurants – there is no shortage of places to meet your friends, colleagues and clients.

Part of Tribe Kampala co working space. (Photo credit: Tribe Kampala)

Design Hub Kampala

Design Hub Kampala is becoming one of the most popular co-working spaces in Kampala. The 2000sqm renovated warehouse recently opened its doors to a collaborative work environment where different people (entrepreneurs, freelancers, designers, writers, product developers, marketing minds, tech start-ups, and makers) can feel comfortable working on their own projects, while having the possibility of sharing, engaging and in essence, creating together with others.

Design Hub is one of the most spacious co-working place in Kampala (internet photo)

Hive Colab

Founded in 2010, Hive Colab is noted as being one of Africa’s first innovation hubs of note along with the IHub. Hive Colab incubates companies and startups critical to Uganda’s technology ecosystem. It focus on technology verticals that we consider cornerstones to the country’s emerging digital economies: financial technologies (fin tech), medical technologies (med-tech), educational technologies (ed tech), agricultural technologies (ag tech), and technology for governance (tech4gov).

A team at Hive Colab. (Internet Photo)

The Square

The Square is one of the most popular destination for some of the networking events around Kampala. Located on 10th Street Industrial Area. The co-working space is a flexible work-space. Desk space, Office Space, Meeting Rooms and Event Space make it a convenient one-stop shop for your business needs.

BBC Focus on Africa presenter Sophie Ikenye interviewing artist Cindy Sanyu at the Square. (Internet photo)

The Mawazo Innovations Hub

Mawazo Hub offices. (internet Photo)

The Mawazo Innovation Hub has created a unique space for high-tech entrepreneurs, academics, researchers and venture capitalists to meet, network and collectively work towards growing the Ugandan economy through innovation. Its value-adding business support services contribute to the growth and globalization of technology rich enterprises in an environment that promotes innovation and enhances competitiveness for knowledge-based entrepreneurs. Thee Hub is located on Plot 593 block 28 Off Mugazi Awongererwa Rd, next to Makerere University.           
       

The Innovations Village

The Innovation Village is a leading destination entrepreneurs in Uganda call home. Located at 3rd Floor Block B & C Ntinda Complex, it’s purpose is to deliberately grow innovation by putting in place a platform that challenges assumption, ignites thought and questions status quo. As a launchpad for innovators, The Innovations Village bring together partners, startups, investors and researchers to act as one force for good.

Innovations Village is one of the creative and well designed co-working spaces in Kampala. (Internet photo)

Outbox Hub

In one sentence, Outbox Hub is “The launchpad for new ideas”

Since its launch in 2012, Outbox Hub has been helping new and upcoming African entrepreneurs interested in using technology to build high growth companies with workspace, mentorship, and training programs. Through partnerships, Outbox Hub helps them raise money for their ventures and access markets. It also works with students, developers, researchers and organizations to build inclusive communities that entrepreneurs can tap into for talent and collaboration. Outbox is built on the principles of sustainability, solving real problems, collaboration, openness and transparency, commitment and personal excellence.

A session in progress at Outbox. (Internet photo)

VentureLabs East Africa

Found at Plot 7, Binayomba Road, Bugolobi, VentureLabs East Africa Hub runs as a co-working space for innovative start-ups and small companies. A like-minded, entrepreneurial community, members are central to the VentureLabs network, but work independently of the venture development process. It brings together global and local networks of entrepreneurs, developers, research partners and investors to explore, incubate and launch innovations. These are designed to deliver venture returns, along with systemic social and environmental change.

Part of the co-working spaces at VenturesLabs. (Internet Photo)

The TechBuzz Hub

TechBuzz Hub is a collaborative working space focused on youth capacity building and startup development. It offers co-working space and access to business development services such as mentorship, consultancy, incubation, associate networking services, training and seminars.

The interior at TechBuzz Hub. (Internet photo)

Think we missed out any worksing space(s) or have something to share? Write to us: info@thisisuganda.org, or connect with us on Facebook and Twitter.

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